Tag: remember this

Stream of consciousness tweets

I love Twitter, but sometimes 140 characters are just not enough for me to properly share what I’m processing. Because of this, I’ll end up tweeting a bunch of things in a row. I’ve taken to calling these my stream of consciousness tweets. This past Saturday, July 10th, a date that had been very significant to me in the past, went by without me evening realizing what day it was. It took me by surprise at first. And then I starting turning it over in my head, and… stream of consciousness tweets was the result. I want to share these tweets here, because I these words are import to me:

 

 

A Quick Thought on Saying Sorry

As you should be, Loki.

When did it become uncool to apologize?

Saying you’re sorry and actually meaning it seems to have developed a whole new meaning lately.  I’ve read countless articles in men’s and women’s magazines alike warning against apologizing.  I’ve seen so many blog posts championing the ‘times you should never ever apologize’ mentality.  Bloggers and columnists are telling us that apologizing for certain things can show weakness, or worse, could cost us ‘winning’ an argument.

Now, maybe my Canadian is showing, but I fail to see how admitting you made a mistake and feeling a bit of regret for effing up is a sign of weakness. Or that winning every argument is the most important thing when it comes to conflicts.

Sure, apologizing is not always the most comfortable thing to do in the world. It can be awkward. It can be hard to admit you’ve made a mistake. It can leave you feeling vulnerable, and as a general rule, we humans do not like that so much. But sometimes, a genuine, authentic apology is the first step to letting go of your fuck ups, of working through hurt feelings and, most important of all in my opinion; an apology requires the reflection on a situation that helps you learn from your mistakes.

 

 

 

Secret Santa

My dad’s parents settled in the north end of the city shortly after they were married.  They were married in September 1956, so their first married Christmas happened just a few months after their wedding.  A few days before December 25th that year, my grandparents received a notice from the department store Sears that their stove had been paid off.   They asked around, trying to find out who had been so generous by paying off their stove, but no one seemed to have any idea who’d paid it.  It was a mystery.

The next Christmas, my grandparents were celebrating their first Christmas as parents.  It was my dad’s very first Christmas.  Again, a few days before Christmas, they received a delivery from Sears.  It was a Christmas present for my Dad, from this secret Santa.  My grandparents still had no idea where the special deliveries were coming from.  By each Christmas growing up, my dad and his siblings would always receive a mystery delivery from this generous secret Santa.

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